A Nice Place to Visit, But I Wouldn’t Want to Live There

I have always found history fascinating, especially 19th century history, and I especially enjoy reading historical romances. Unfortunately, many of the romance novels published nowadays contain graphic sexuality, and it is becoming difficult to find ones which do not include detailed descriptions of immoral behavior. So I decided to write one which I myself would enjoy reading, with no graphic sexuality and with Catholic characters.

The 19th century was one which had experienced the 1812 War, the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, the reign of Queen Victoria and the invention of photography. I find myself in awe of the quality of the daguerreotypes and tintypes, but I am most intrigued with the expressions on people’s faces in these early photographs.

Years ago, I bought a book on the Centennial Exhibition of 1876 (which took place in Philadelphia) and I imagined being part of such an extravagant event. Those brief thoughts were the beginning of my novel, In Name Only (www.fullquiverpublishing.com)

As much as I find history fascinating, there are many aspects of Victorian life which do not appeal to me, like corsets, repressed sexuality, outhouses, women having few legal rights, women dying in childbirth and so on.

I’ve been told by my physician that if I had lived in the 19th century, I probably would have died in childbirth. So I’m happy to be living in the 21st century, in a house built 17 years ago, where I can curl up on a comfortable Lazy Boy chair, turn up the heat and read a great historical novel.

Copyright 2009 Ellen Gable Hrkach

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “A Nice Place to Visit, But I Wouldn’t Want to Live There

  1. but outhouses don’t have toilets and sinks that leak, no windows to fog up when having a shower, and no need to pour chemicals down the drain.

  2. Makes me think of the 1900 House series on TV when the mother and daughter started out all rosy and excited but then ended up sobbing because they hated life in the early 1900s….

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s