Quality Time in Parenting

In his book, Green Beans and Legacies, Robert P. Newberry offers a list of nine basics for parenting.  One of them is: A lot of quality time is required to raise a successful child.

The author uses his career as educator, counselor, therapist, lecturer and consultant to share advice and tips on raising successful children. However, Newberry especially uses his experience as the parent of three grown children.  In the chapter on the above Basic, Newberry shares examples of how he and his wife spent quality time with their children, but also how others — like a naval officer who spent six months a year away from his family — spent quality time by reading into cassettes while he was away.  Nowadays, with FaceTime and Skype, absent parents can spend quality time with their children even if they are far away.

When I became pregnant with our first child, my husband and I decided that I would stay home with our children. I enjoyed playing games, reading and playing with Lego with them. Just because a mother stays at home doesn’t necessarily mean she is giving her children quality time, however.  Newberry states in his book: “I know of other parents who are physically with their children often, but are present to them rarely in terms of attention, care and concern.”

I’ve also known mothers who have worked full-time but were able to spend wonderful quality time with their children in the evening and on weekends.

So how do you get quality time if you’re working long hours? Newberry offers an example of writing a Christmas letter to each of his children every year. “Each letter included our own personal reflection of how he or she had grown and matured through the previous year. The letter provided an opportunity to offer encouragement for upcoming challenges and to convey our strong support and concern for his or her well-being.”

When our children were small, my husband worked 60 hours weeks. However, when he was home, he spent time reading to our boys before bed and as they became older, they shared their love of music by playing together in our own family band. In fact, most of our children began playing musical instruments (not because we insisted, but because they wanted to) taking the example of their father’s musical talents, and spent much of their free time learning songs on the guitar, piano and drums.

Quality time with your children is possible whether or not you are a full-time homemaker or work a full-time job.

I highly recommend Robert P. Newberry’s book, Green Beans and Legacies as an invaluable resource for helping parents raise successful children.  Click on this link to download the Kindle edition or this link to purchase the paperback book.

For more information on this Basics and on Newberry’s book, Green Beans and Legacies, click on this link: http://www.robertpnewberry.com

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It Takes a Parent to Raise a Child

We’ve all heard the adage, “It takes a village to raise a child.”

Although there is some truth to that adage, author Robert P. Newberry challenges parents with, “it takes a parent to raise a child.”

In his book, Green Beans and Legacies, Newberry outlines his “Basics for Raising Successful Children” and makes it clear that there is no substitute for a parent in raising a child.  His first Basic is: The responsibility of raising a child lies squarely on the parent’s shoulders. While getting assistance from relatives, the community and friends can certainly make parenting easier, such help is optional and limited in what it can do. The village or community cannot give your child that “special-ness” that only parents can give.

Mr. Newberry does more than challenge parents, however.  He provides guidance and encouragement, showing parents how to build credibility with their children in order to influence and teach them about how to build a successful life. As one reviewer notes, “Your style of writing is so inviting and inspires the reader to want to become engaged.  The anecdotes are wonderful and make the trials of parenting realistic.”

Mr. Newberry illustrates the importance of parents – not just parents, but parents who are present – in his book.  The author includes eight “Basics” that can easily be used as a self-assessment by any reader in evaluating the effectiveness of how they are utilizing their parental authority.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a stay-at-home parent or one who works outside the home. It doesn’t matter whether you’re the natural parent or the adoptive parent.  It doesn’t matter whether you’re a single parent or whether you’re parenting with your spouse.  What does matter is that parenting takes consistent effort and a great deal of quality time.  But, Newberry argues, it can be done very successfully and there is nothing that offers such great rewards!

Green Beans and Legacies is the first of three books in the Raising Successful Children Series. I highly recommend this terrific resource for parents. It is available on Kindle and in paperback here at this link.

For more information on the author and his books, check out his website at: http://www.robertpnewberry.com