FQP Sale – Books for 1.99 #socialisolation

On this Feast of the Annunciation,

here are the FQP books that are on sale for 1.99 until March 30th.

INO series Promo

O’Donovan Family Series by Ellen Gable

In Name Only (Gold Medal winner, 2010 IPPY Awards)

A Subtle Grace (Finalist 2015 IAN Historical, Romance)

each regularly priced 4.99

Father's Son Promo

The Father’s Son by Jim Sano

regularly priced 5.99

Lady Doc Promo

The Lady Doc Murders by Barbara Golder

Dying for Revenge

Dying for Compassion

Each regularly priced 4.99

Discovery Promo

Discovery by Karina Fabian

Regularly priced: 4.99

Huge #Sale of FQP Books on #Kindle #socialisolation

Looking for some cheap but quality reading during this time of social isolation?

FQP has reduced all its books for this one week sale to take place today through Monday March 30 at 11:45 p.m.

The following books are on sale for .99

(Tomorrow’s post will list the books on sale for 1.99)

99 cent promo FQP

A Channel of Your Peace by Veronica Smallhorn

Angela’s Song by AnnMarie Creedon

Rightfully Ours by Carolyn Astfalk

Stealing Jenny by Ellen Gable

Growing Up in God’s Image by Carolyn Smith

Don’t You Forget About Me by Erin McCole Cupp

Emily’s Hope by Ellen Gable (2006 IPPY Awards, Honorable Mention)

    The Lion’s Heart by Dena Hunt (CALA Winner)

Great War Promo

Great War Great Love Series by Ellen Gable

Julia’s Gifts

Charlotte’s Honor

Ella’s Promise

Heaven Intended Promo

Heaven Intended Series by Amanda Lauer

A World Such as Heaven Intended (CALA Winner)

A Life Such as Heaven Intended

A Love Such as Heaven Intended

Astfalk Promo

Stay With Me Series by Carolyn Astfalk

Come Back to Me

(Come Back to Me will be on sale for .99 early tomorrow morning)

Stay With Me  (IAN finalist)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Channel of Your Peace: Interview With Veronica Smallhorn

A Channel of Your Peace front coverI’m participating in the Virtual Book Tour for A Channel of Your Peace by Veronica Smallhorn.  Today, I have an interview with the author!

This is your first novel.  What inspired you to write a Catholic novel?

When I was ten, I wrote a story for my school’s ‘Book Week’ writing competition. I worked hard on it, and remember feeling quite thrilled and exhilarated when I finished it. I handwrote the title page before stapling it together — putting my story title, name, and a copyright symbol for good measure, and decided that one day I wanted to be published for real!

But as for writing something specifically Catholic, your own books, Ellen, were what inspired me. I always thought it would be unlikely I could ever publish the type of fiction I wanted to write. I didn’t realise it was possible to publish Catholic stories in our day and age. The first of your own books that I read were Emily’s Hope and In Name Only, and it wasn’t until then that the idea to write a Catholic story – one that focused on the Church’s teachings on marriage and family – started to form.

 Tell us about A Channel of Your Peace in two sentences.

A Channel of Your Peace is a story about love — not only the love that can exist between a man and a woman, but also, and more importantly, the love of God for each and every one of us. It is also about that wonderful virtue of hope; hope that God can, and will, draw good from evil if we put our trust in Him.

How much of you and your husband are in the characters of Katrina and Emilio (Erin’s sister and brother-in-law)?

While I didn’t base Katrina and Emilio on myself and my husband Pablo, I did draw a bit on the experience of our life together which made them easier for me to write — it’s something that I know. When I was in the early planning stages of the story, I knew Erin would need some convincing to make a long flight to Mexico. Having her family help her along seemed like a good way to get her there.

I really didn’t base Katrina on myself, but when I was choosing a profession for Emilio, I did draw on Pablo’s expertise – he has a PhD in philosophy. It was fun to give Emilio a position as a university lecturer in philosophy!

Your description of the Cathedral in Mexico and the miraculous image of Our Lady of Guadalupe are very well done.  Have you been there before and, if so, what has been your experience? 

Thank you! Yes, I’ve been to the basilica four times, back when Pablo and I lived in Mexico when we were first married. We were very blessed to live only about three hours’ drive from Mexico City, so we used to make our own little pilgrimages. While I never experienced anything as obviously miraculous as Erin did, I can honestly say that each time we went the experience was most touching. Notwithstanding the crowds and tourists (on weekends and feast days it’s standing room only!) I always experienced a wonderful peace and joy in the basilica and found myself drawn irresistibly to the image of Our Lady. She really is present there. I always wanted to get as close as I could, so I would go back and forth on those travelators again and again.

It’s true that even the authentic replicas don’t quite do the original image justice. Seeing the real tilma is really quite an experience in itself, if you have faith. I think that’s what draws so many people there every year. In addition, I’ve always found it fascinating that this Marian apparition site is unique among her other apparition sites. At Guadalupe, Our Lady left something of herself behind on Saint Juan Diego’s tilma; that piece of fabric made from a cactus plant which shouldn’t have lasted more than a few years. And yet, here it still is, almost 500 years later. Extraordinary!

How would you describe the target audience for your book?

When I started writing the novel, I set out with young women in mind as my target audience, more or less around the age of my lead character Erin, who is about 27. It’s a love story, in large part, and we girls love a good romance! Although, it’s my hope the book may reach a wider audience. I was surprised at the positive reaction I received from the men who read the manuscript prior to publication, ranging in age between 30 and 80. The story carries a strong theme about the freedom we experience on embracing God’s teaching, which is essentially for everyone, even if the book may not be everyone’s preferred genre.

Tell us more about yourself and your family.

My husband Pablo and I have been married for 14 years. Pablo is Mexican, and we lived in Mexico for three years when we were first married and had our first child there. We now live in Canberra, Australia (my home city) and have three children; two boys and a girl. Pablo is an academic – he has a number of degrees and completed his PhD by way of multiple publications which appeared in journals all over the world. In terms of formal education, I’m the exact opposite to him as I never attended university. But our joint love of writing, albeit different forms of writing, is something that has been a lovely common ground in our marriage. I’m sure I would never have finished my novel if he hadn’t been cheering me on.

Our family life is pretty busy — anyone who has raised a family, or is in the midst of raising one, knows how intense a job this is! It seems to get more intense with each passing year as the kids move further along in their studies and interests. We have a fairly interesting, culturally-mixed family life and all our children are bilingual. I still don’t speak Spanish, but I do understand a lot of what I hear around the house; enough to be able to join an exclusively Spanish conversation – speaking in English, of course. It makes for entertaining listening (downright hilarious, actually, if I misunderstand something!) Pablo and I combined the names of our countries early in our marriage and often refer to our home as ‘Mextralia’!

The one thing that transcends all the cultural intricacies and differences is our faith. Weekly, or more-than-weekly Mass, regular Confession and the daily Rosary are pillars in our family life. Pablo and I try to present to the children the perfect example of the Holy Family of Nazareth as the one we should all be striving to imitate each day – though some days are definitely better than others! We’re just muddling through the best we can, just like everyone else. Which is all any of us can do, I think.

Download or purchase the book at this link.

 

An Open Book – March #openbook

Today, I’m joining with Carolyn Astfalk and Catholic Mom for An Open Book. Here’s what I’ve been reading for the past month.

A Channel of Your Peace front cover

A Channel of Your Peace by Veronica Smallhorn

New book by Full Quiver Publishing!

Synopsis: Would a God who truly loves you allow things to get this bad?

Lapsed Catholic Erin Rafferty has the life she always wanted. Or at least she did, till the moment her fiancé of five years announces he’s leaving her for another woman. Heartbroken and humiliated, a further devastating development leaves her wondering if she can ever live a normal life again.

Mark Ashcroft is a devout Catholic looking for an equally devout Catholic wife. A chance encounter with Erin leaves Mark completely captivated, yet deeply unsettled, knowing Erin is not in a place to accept him, nor is she the model Christian woman he’d hoped to start a life with.

A tentative friendship begins, and Erin finds herself questioning her long-held rejection of her faith, while Mark finds himself healing from memories of his own wounded past.

But as love grows, further tragedy in Erin’s life threatens her burgeoning faith and her hope for a future with Mark.

What follows is a difficult journey of love, surrender, trust, and faith in the ultimate knowledge that Christ is always in the midst of our sufferings.

 

Come Back to Me Front

Come Back to Me: Stay With Me #2 by Carolyn Astfalk

New Book by Full Quiver Publishing!

Synopsis: After his wife, Jamie, kicks him out, Alan moves in with his brother and sister-in-law, who are expecting a baby. As the days turn to months, the prospect of a reunion grows dimmer, and Alan is left to pick up the pieces of his broken marriage while bunking alongside blissfully happy newlyweds.

Megan, Jamie’s friend, is privy to both Jamie’s and Alan’s private woes, meeting Jamie to lend an ear and occupying a barstool next to Alan. Megan’s dissatisfaction with her own life—meaningless hookups, a brother who’s found Jesus, and an increasingly awkward relationship with Jamie and Alan—grows.

Alan comes to his sister-in-law’s aid when she goes into labor, forcing him to act with long-overdue maturity. Meanwhile, through a conversation with her mother, Jamie realizes a skewed perception of her father’s indifference and her own fears have led her to be harder on Alan than he deserves.

Forced to come to terms with her unresolved grief, Megan discovers the need to make amends and start fresh.

Stay with Me front cover

The prequel to Come Back to Me is Stay With Me (Stay With Me #1)

 

Though War Be Waged

Though War be Waged Upon Me

by Carol Puschaver

Synopsis: Make no mistake. Satan is very much alive — and hellbent on revenge. He is waging war against humanity, and indeed against all creation, with the reckless abandon of one who has nothing more to lose. Cast out of heaven; crushed at the foot of the Cross, he is multiplying evil and outrage and scandal to unprecedented effect as he “strikes at [the] heel” (Gen 3.15) of “fallen mankind” (St. Joseph Edition of the New American Bible, Revised Edition, 9).Without question we are living in a time of increasingly brazen evil. That is to say, a time of extraordinary and abundant grace also. Christ has already won the final victory over Satan. By His grace, we stand strong against the forces of evil. By that same ineffable grace, we stand in the company of holy angels — most especially the glorious Warrior Archangel Saint Michael. And the high ground belongs to us!

My review: This is a beautiful booklet dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel.  If you thought the only St. Michael prayer was the one we sometimes say at the end of Mass, then this book will be an eye opener for you.  Included is a history of the St. Michael prayers as well as a chaplet and reflections. Highly recommend.

The Day the World Came to Town

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede

Synopsis: The True Story Behind the Events on 9/11 that Inspired Broadway’s Smash Hit Musical Come from Away

When 38 jetliners bound for the United States were forced to land at Gander International Airport in Canada by the closing of U.S. airspace on September 11, the population of this small town on Newfoundland Island swelled from 10,300 to nearly 17,000. The citizens of Gander met the stranded passengers with an overwhelming display of friendship and goodwill.

As the passengers stepped from the airplanes, exhausted, hungry and distraught after being held on board for nearly 24 hours while security checked all of the baggage, they were greeted with a feast prepared by the townspeople. Local bus drivers who had been on strike came off the picket lines to transport the passengers to the various shelters set up in local schools and churches. Linens and toiletries were bought and donated. A middle school provided showers, as well as access to computers, email, and televisions, allowing the passengers to stay in touch with family and follow the news.

Over the course of those four days, many of the passengers developed friendships with Gander residents that they expect to last a lifetime. As a show of thanks, scholarship funds for the children of Gander have been formed and donations have been made to provide new computers for the schools. This book recounts the inspiring story of the residents of Gander, Canada, whose acts of kindness have touched the lives of thousands of people and been an example of humanity and goodwill.

My review:  This was an enjoyable read of a group of passengers from 38 planes who were diverted to Gander, Newfoundland on 9/11.  It shows the contrast between the horrific terrorism of that day and the generosity of the people of Gander to welcome strangers into their homes and lives.  9/11 made me proud to be American. This story made me proud to be Canadian. Beautiful book.

Dead Wake

Dead Wake by Erik Larson

Synopsis:  #1 New York Times Bestseller!   From the bestselling author and master of narrative nonfiction comes the enthralling story of the sinking of the Lusitania.

On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era’s great transatlantic “Greyhounds”—the fastest liner then in service—and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack.

Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot-20, was happy to oblige. Meanwhile, an ultra-secret British intelligence unit tracked Schwieger’s U-boat, but told no one. As U-20 and the Lusitania made their way toward Liverpool, an array of forces both grand and achingly small—hubris, a chance fog, a closely guarded secret, and more—all converged to produce one of the great disasters of history.

It is a story that many of us think we know but don’t, and Erik Larson tells it thrillingly, switching between hunter and hunted while painting a larger portrait of America at the height of the Progressive Era. Full of glamour and suspense, Dead Wake brings to life a cast of evocative characters, from famed Boston bookseller Charles Lauriat to pioneering female architect Theodate Pope to President Woodrow Wilson, a man lost to grief, dreading the widening war but also captivated by the prospect of new love.

Gripping and important, Dead Wake captures the sheer drama and emotional power of a disaster whose intimate details and true meaning have long been obscured by history.

My review: I’ve just discovered this author and plan to read every book he’s written. He writes non-fiction like it’s fiction, but everything is fact-based.  I knew very little of what happened during the sinking of the Lusitania, and this is a fascinating account of all the events leading up to it and the people who were involved. My only criticism is that there were no photos and in a book like this, there should be photos. Highly recommend!

Jesus Perfect Love

Jesus Perfect Love Lawrence Jakows

Synopsis: Jesus tells us and shows us how much He loves us and how we can return this amazing love. Appreciate and learn more about His love through His Sacred Heart, His Sacraments, His Saints, His Holy Scriptures, His Cross, His Death, His Resurrection. Jesus, the second person of the Most Holy Trinity, has boundless love for everyone. It is our Christian obligation to discover His Holy love in our hearts. Then respond to and return His love so that we may be found worthy for sainthood in heaven for eternity. Many saints and martyrs of the Catholic Church have written beautiful prose and poetry describing and understanding God’s most powerful and amazing love. Several saintly excerpts are included herein to encourage our spiritual growth and piety. Learn about His love from the following saints, and many more: St. Augustine of Hippo, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Frances de Sales, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Bridget of Sweden, St. Therese of Lisieux. Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life.

My review: This is a beautiful book with a collection of essays about God’s Perfect Love, Jesus.  The author includes quotes from Scripture, saints and prayers.  This is an excellent book that describes how we can adore, believe in, hope in and trust in this Perfect Love through the sacraments, Adoration, the holy Rosary and spiritual reading.  My only criticism of the book is that Fasting is only mentioned through Scripture and not in any way explained. Fasting is truly one of the most important tools for spiritual growth and love of God, especially in this culture. Highly recommend.

 

 

 

 

 

Interview With Carolyn Astfalk

Come Back to Me FrontWhat inspired you to first start writing fiction?

Looking back, I’ve always had a rather cinematic imagination that allowed stories to play out in my mind. However, I wrote strictly nonfiction until 2010, when I gave National Novel Writing Month a shot. That manuscript, after many years and much revision, became Rightfully Ours. Once I started writing, the stories flowed more easily, and I enjoyed the challenge of taking all of those words and making something meaningful out of them.

What inspired you to write a sequel to Stay With Me?

Initially, I was looking for something new to write, and the characters from Stay With Me were still active in my imagination. I knew there was more to Alan and Jamie’s story. Initially, I’d considered that Alan may have had a problem with pornography, something I ended up developing with different characters in All in Good Time.

Tell us about Come Back to Me in one sentence.

A separated couple and their mutual friend must master their selfishness and immaturity to find purpose and grace enough to start over.

Are Alan and Megan based on anyone you know or are they totally fictional characters?

Alan and Jamie were inspired by the experience my husband and I had with Catholic Engaged Encounter. In 1996, on the weekend retreat we attended in preparation for our own marriage, we were one of only three couples who weren’t already living together. Oddly enough for a church-sponsored event, the six of us were put on the defensive about it by the other couples and bonded pretty quickly. When we later got involved with Engaged Encounter as volunteers, most of the couples coming through the program were living together already too.

Statistically, couples that live together before marriage, especially those living together without plans to marry, are more likely to divorce. So the couples on those weekends, though they desired happy, long-lasting marriages, were putting themselves at a disadvantage. Alan and Jamie let me explore why couples in those situations are more likely to struggle.

Megan is entirely fictional although I’ve observed a family implode much like Megan’s did following the death of a child. Everything and every member of the family was turned on its head.

Do you have specific rituals when you write?  A certain place or time?  Music that you listen to?  A special beverage?

I’ve always had to write whenever I could grab a few minutes either while babies were napping or kids were otherwise occupied. Lately I’ve been less inclined to write amidst constant distractions, so I’m grateful that I now have some quiet time to write—when I can discipline myself to do it. We’re pressed for space in our house, so my writing has always been done on my laptop at the dining room table, sometimes with a Spotify playlist to set the mood. Though I’m naturally a night owl, I prefer to write earlier in the day and read at night. I typically have a mug of hot tea next to the computer.

Of the now five novels you’ve written, which is your favorite and why?

Ornamental Graces is my favorite. Dan and Emily had a lot of obstacles to overcome, but their intentions were good, and though it took time for Dan to get to a place where he could be the man Emily needed, their love never really faltered, even when they tried to fight it. Though the book spans every season, I think the Christmas setting that bookends the story makes it that much sweeter.

What do you like to read?  Who are some of your favorite authors?

I read a variety of genres, but I always come back to character-driven contemporary Catholic and Christian romance. I enjoy reading books by the many Catholic authors I consider friends, such as Theresa Linden, Leslea Wahl, and yourself. Elizabeth Byler Younts, Courtney Walsh, and Denise Hunter are a few of my favorite Christian authors. I also try to slip in some classics, though not enough. Willa Cather is one of my favorite classic authors.

Tell us more about yourself and your family. Are you working on any more novels?

My husband and I have four children ages 7-16. We try not to overextend ourselves with activities, but even so there is plenty to keep us busy with Scouts, 4-H, sports, musical instruments, and other extra-curricular activities. I’m chairperson of a national pro-life organization based in Pennsylvania, and now that the children are all in school, I’ve been able to volunteer more often at our school and parish and attend a Bible study. I should probably be spending more time cleaning house.

I have two novels in progress that I hope to complete in 2020. One, which I call Lost and Found, is a contemporary romance set in the New River Gorge of West Virginia involving an adventure guide/amateur Bigfoot hunter and a girl who’s defined her self-worth and others’ by their weight. The other is a second-chance contemporary romance between a man and woman whose paths cross time and time again in ways they are sometimes unaware. I’ve been calling that one The Light Between. After that, there’s a Young Adult novel I’ve been developing in my mind that I’ve yet to put on paper.

Speaking the Truth With Our Bodies #TOB

Silhouette of a couple of friends breathing at sunset

image from iStock credit AntonioGuillem

My new column at Catholic Mom: “The body reveals the person… Science can examine our flesh in minute detail… But no amount of scientific exploration can replace the truth that our bodies reveal us, giving form to our innermost being and unique personality. Our bodies are sacramental—they make the invisible visible.”  (St. John Paul II, Theology of the Body)

Part of the brilliance of the Theology of the Body is that it forces us to think about how our bodies speak a language: we can speak the truth or tell a lie with our bodies.  When husband and wife marry, they promise to love as God loves; freely, totally, faithfully and fruitfully.

Have you ever been lied to?  Deceived?  Jesus was deceived by Judas. It was not a betrayal of words, but with a kiss…with his body.

When I was in high school, the drama teacher asked whether I’d like to be in the school’s one act play. The part she had in mind for me was a fairy; it only had one line at the end: “It will end happily; it will, it will!”  At the time, I was very small person and I wore dark glasses.  Even with the shimmery dress and fairy’s wand, I’m sure I looked more like a nerd than a fairy.

Each day for a week, we rehearsed the entire play. At the end of each rehearsal, the curtains closed, and I easily walked through to give my one line.

On the night of the performance, just as the play finished and after the curtains were drawn shut, I moved into position. As I pulled at the two sides of the curtain, it felt like they were sewn shut.  I frantically struggled with it until, all of a sudden, it abruptly separated, and I plunged forward, right onto my knees, the audience roaring with laughter. I sputtered out my line, but with the noise of the crowd, no one could hear it.  I turned around and when I got behind the curtain, I was on the verge of tears.  That’s when a few of the cast members tried to console me by telling me how funny I was.  Yes, I’m sure falling down in front of 300 people was funny. But, that wasn’t supposed to happen. Why couldn’t I get that darned curtain open?

I found out later that the cast had decided not to tell me that they were planning to hold the inner part of the curtains closed to keep me from coming out, then opening them after ten seconds because they wanted my stumble out onto the stage to be as real as possible.

I felt like a fool.  I felt like my smallness was being mocked. I felt like my ability to be in the play was distrusted. And I didn’t like being deceived. What’s more, this lie was not just one of words. It was a physical act, causing me to struggle, experience panic, fall to the floor and produce tears of embarrassment and failure.

Fast-forward ten years into the future.  My (Catholic) fiancé and I were having an argument, a big one. We had already decided not to have sex before marriage. Now he was insisting that we use Natural Family Planning instead of a ‘reliable’ method of birth control after marriage. I knew that the Church taught that contraception was immoral.  But no one listened to the Church anymore, right?  And NFP wasn’t effective, was it?

When he tried to explain that having sex with contraception would be a lie made with our bodies, I scoffed at him.  I had been taught well by the public schools and the media. I was convinced that contraception was the responsible thing to do. He countered with, “If you used a diaphragm or I used a condom, I wouldn’t be able to ignore that a piece of latex was involved in our consummation. It should be you, me and God, that’s all,”  and “if we used contraception, it would be like attending Mass with earplugs in our ears.”

My incredibly bright, artistic and 20-year-old fiancé tried to help me understand in layman’s terms what was so wrong with contraception.  He seemed to know inherently that our bodies were so good, that we must treat them with respect and reverence. In the end, I still didn’t understand his idealistic views, but I trusted him (and the Church) just enough to agree to give up the idea of using contraception.

After we had been married for six months, I started to better understand what James was trying to explain. I experienced firsthand a marriage without contraception. My husband’s ‘language of the body’ told me that he loved me freely, without reservation, faithfully and fruitfully.

Our bodies do have a language and, with it, the capacity to tell the truth or to lie. But not just a simple, interpersonal language. It goes deeper than that.  God communicates to us through sex. Human beings can be conceived from the one-flesh union of man and woman. When a life is created, God utters the word that creates this new human person with an eternal soul.

This teaching is an ideal, to be sure. Speaking the truth with our bodies creates a lifelong spiritual, emotional and physical bond that leads the couple in virtue and towards heaven…and it isn’t always easy.

The challenge is that many couples either ignore or are unaware of this ideal of speaking the truth with our bodies.

In the movie Vanilla Sky, of their sexual relationship, Cameron Diaz’s character says to Tom Cruise’s character:  “Don’t you know that when you sleep with someone, your body makes a promise whether you do or not.”

With their bodies, a couple who uses contraception says, I take you to be my spouse, but I don’t take your fertility (or fruitfulness).

While it is possible for a same-sex couple to be free, total and faithful, it is impossible for a same-sex couple to be fruitful. Their union cannot by its nature be life-giving.

A couple who has pre-marital sex is often using contraception, so they’re not loving in a way that is fruitful or total. A couple who is fornicating is renewing vows that have never been spoken. Often, they’re not free because sex can become a conquest or a habit, and little by little, they can lose their sense of self-control.

When sex produces a life, it means that something went right, not wrong.  Contraception isn’t 100 percent effective and unplanned pregnancies still occur.  Some of those women have abortions when unplanned pregnancies happen. But even abortions are a lie. God has said that this unborn child is a person, but the woman says, “No, ‘it’ is not.”  Children are the fruit of married life, of sex, and they deserve to live.

No one likes being on the receiving end of deception. I found this out firsthand. It is the same the world over.

Our bodies speak a language. In the same way that we can lie with our tongues, we can also lie with our bodies.  NFP allows a couple to speak the truth with their bodies.

To learn more about NFP:

http://www.ccli.org

https://www.creightonmodel.com/       https://billings.life/en/

https://www.marquette.edu/nursing/natural-family-planning.php

Copyright 2020 Ellen Gable Hrkach

Stay With Me Only .99 on #Kindle #Bargain

Stay with Me front cover

Stay With Me Kindle Edition is on sale for only .99 today through Friday at noon Eastern!

Finalist in the 2016 IAN Book Awards (Romance)!!

Synopsis: With her sister Abby’s encouragement, Rebecca has moved out of their overbearing father’s home. When a chance encounter with Chris ends with an invitation, Rebecca says yes. The authentic way Chris lives his life attracts Rebecca and garners her affection.

Chris loves Rebecca and her innocence, but he’s confounded by the emotional scars she bears from her parents and an attempted assault. Her father’s disdain for Chris’s faith and career only make matters worse.

With the counsel of their friend Father John, can Rebecca and Chris overcome every obstacle and bridge the deepening gulf between them and her dad? Or will a crucial lapse in judgment and its repercussion end their relationship?

Review:
This is a warning: the book you hold in your hand is compelling and well-written and you may find it, as I did, impossible to put down. It’s a romance that’s not trashy in any way, one that illustrates what a novel of this sort should inspire in its reader. When you’re finished, you’ll be a better person. (And probably a very tired one, because you’ll have stayed up all night to finish it.) You’ll also be sharing this book with every woman you know!
– Sarah Reinhard, author and blogger at SnoringScholar.com